NSW Department of Education

Using technology in schools – your rights and responsibilities

For teachers
For parents
For students

Key message

In order to ensure that all students and teachers in public schools can be provided with safe, secure and quality access to the internet, the NSW Department of Education expects all staff and students to understand and abide by the Online Communications Services: acceptable usage policy.

We want to support our students when they’re at school by offering them safe, secure and quality access to the internet. The NSW Department of Education’s policy for Online Communication Services: acceptable usage for school students outlines the rights and responsibilities for staff and students whenever they are using the internet at a school or other Department of Education location.

What is the Acceptable Usage Policy?

Did you know that you agree to the department's acceptable usage policy every time you log in to a computer or laptop that’s managed by the Department of Education?

If you’ve ever logged into a Department of Education computer, you may have spotted the notice that appears just before you log in. Some of you may have even skipped right past without realising what it means.

That notice is a reminder about your rights and responsibilities when using technology or infrastructure that is managed by the NSW Department of Education. This means whenever you log in to a school computer or connect to a school’s wireless network, you are agreeing to follow the expectations of acceptable behaviour set out by the policy.

Teachers can read the policy on the NSW Department of Education’s Online Communication Services: acceptable usage for school students on the department intranet.

For students

Students have a right to expect secure access to the internet and selected online services as a part of their education. Access to the internet and online communication services are provided for the exclusive purpose of research, learning and communication between students and staff.

Students have a responsibility to report inappropriate behaviour and material to their teacher. Internet and online communication services are provided with virus protection, web filtering and other safeguards, and students must not attempt to disable or defeat these protections. Students must not share passwords or use another person’s account.

Your school has rules and procedures in place around the use of mobile phones while you are on school grounds or on excursions. The 2019 review into the use of mobile phones in schools recommended that students be banned from using mobile phones during school time in primary schools. For secondary students, the decision to ban or allow mobile phones lies with the school. Talk to your school's principal if you would like more information about your rights and responsibilities when it comes to using mobile phones in your school.

Students should also be aware that all their emails and web searching history are kept for two years and that these records can be used in school investigations, court proceedings and for other legal reasons.

For parents

From as early as primary school, students and parents are often asked to sign a note that outlines the expectations for using the internet at school. These internet permission notes are the school-level procedure, based on the department-wide policy, and acknowledge the school’s expectations for acceptable behaviour. It is important that you have a discussion with your child before signing their permission note.

If a student has not returned the note, their school account is changed so that they cannot access the internet at school.

If you are a volunteer at the school and need internet access as a part of this role, you will need your own Department of Education guest account. Using another person’s account to access the internet from a school network is a breach of the Acceptable usage policy, regardless of the account or the intended purpose.

Your school’s principal can help you apply for a guest account. Please ask them to complete the Network Guest Account Request for Schools form on your behalf. You will need to provide a current Working With Children Check number.

The 2019 review into the use of mobile phones in schools recommended that mobile phones be banned for primary students during school times. Mobile phones are allowed outside of school hours, and for students in high school the decision to ban or allow phones is left to that school's principal. Consider talking to your child's principal to learn more about how the school has responded to this review in mobile phones.

For teachers

It is a good idea to talk through the acceptable usage policy with your students, and work with them to draw links between policy, classroom expectations and school rules. Your students can co-create the expectations in your classroom, and the consequences that happen when the expectations aren’t met.

If you suspect that a student may have breached the acceptable usage policy, the student could be liable to consequences as set out in your school’s behaviour management plan. In addition to in-school consequences, students who breach the policy could have their internet access revoked by your school’s principal or delegated ICT coordinator.

Talk to your principal or supervisor for more advice on how to apply the acceptable usage policy.

Teachers and principals should also be aware of the 2019 review into the use of mobile phones in schools. Mobile phones are banned during school hours for primary students. For secondary students, it is up to the school's principal to decide whether your school will ban or allow mobile phones during school time.

For principals and school executive

Consider the following questions:

  • How does your school’s behaviour management plan align with the department’s acceptable usage policy?
  • How would you determine the severity of a breach of the policy?
  • How would you gather evidence of a breach?
  • What are appropriate consequences for a breach?

If you are not sure how to answer these questions, it might be helpful to review your school’s behaviour management plan.

Your school’s behaviour management plan already instructs teachers in how to identify and respond to inappropriate behaviour in the classroom and the playground. Inappropriate behaviour online can be treated in similar ways to other inappropriate in-school behaviour. Teachers will feel more confident embedding technology into their teaching and learning if they can rely on consistent school procedures.

Principals can request access to the student’s web search logs or archived emails through EdConnect. Students who are found to have breached the acceptable usage policy can have their internet access revoked, at the Principal’s discretion.

Teachers and principals should also be aware of the 2019 review into the use of mobile phones in schools. Mobile phones are banned during school hours for primary students. For secondary students, it is up to the school's principal to decide whether your school will ban or allow mobile phones during school time.

Top tips

What is the best way to report inappropriate and non-educational web content?

Students are responsible for reporting inappropriate behaviour and material to their teacher or other supervisor. Teachers have discretion to choose how to respond to this inappropriate behaviour, but it’s always a good idea to use your school’s Behaviour Management Plan as a guide.

In addition to in-school consequences, teachers can also request to have websites blocked through the Department of Education’s web filtering request form via EdConnect.

How do I request a website be blocked or unblocked?

Did you know that the Department of Education maintains web filtering lists that restrict student access to particular sites? The Department’s Web Filters are actively monitored and maintained, but many new websites are appearing every day. From time to time, you might find a website that is either uncategorised or miscategorised. As a result, game sites may be inadvertently unblocked and legitimate educational content might be blocked.

Teachers can submit a request through EdConnect to block or unblock a site for students. You can even ask that websites be unblocked only for a certain cohort of students, for example only students in Stage 4 and above.

What happens if I believe a student in my class has breached the acceptable usage policy?

Students who have breached the acceptable usage policy could be liable to consequence set out in your school’s behaviour management plan. Consult your Principal and your school’s behaviour management plan for advice on how best to proceed.

In addition to other in-school consequences, teachers can revoke internet access for students via EMU on the department's portal.

How do I access a student’s web search logs or email archives?

Data about a student’s web search histories and emails sent or received are saved for two years. Principals can requests to access these logs for the purpose of in-school investigations. Students should be made aware that this data can also be used in other legal investigations.

If you would like to access a student’s logs, please talk to your Principal. On your behalf, your Principal can raise a request to EdConnect for access to these logs.

Additional resources

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